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Das Haus by Truly Truly: Maximizing the Home with Blurred Boundaries

Mairi Beautyman
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Instead of walls, objects and furnishings define the flexible living areas of “Living by Moods,” the title given Das Haus 2019.

The experimental home installation serves as a platform for rising stars at international contemporary furniture fair IMM Cologne, which takes place January 14-20, and this year’s designers, Australian-born and Rotterdam-based Kate and Joel Booy, are the husband-and-wife team behind Truly Truly.

Smaller spaces and changes in how people are living today drove the design of room structures, furnishings, materials, colors, and lighting in the 180-square-meter space, say the designers.

These days all sorts of different activities take place all around the home—you might work on your laptop in bed or eat anywhere in the house,” explains Kate.

The Booys made a central kitchen—“where people are always gravitating,” notes Kate—the most prominent space in their home. In order to provide “a certain depth,” the kitchen’s floors and walls are glossy lava stone tile treated with an “acid yellow glaze which becomes a little bit see-through at the edges,” says Joel. The boldness of these tiles is made all the more striking when reflected by the kitchen’s other dominate material, polished stainless steel. “They work well together,” Joel continues.

Forgoing highly structured rooms, the designers then carved out loose zones that blend public and private areas. Based on moods and feelings and defined as Reclining, Serene, Active, and Reclusive, the zones organically extend off of the kitchen. In the Reclining zone, furnishings are likewise. Two walls of adjustable folding screens open or close the house to the Serene zone (the bedroom) and Reclusive is defined by a circular wall made out of vibrant green plants. Active, meanwhile, is adjustable to activity, be it working or eating.

As for furnishings, 22 are Truly Truly products, most dancing the line between function and art. Think sculptural benches and abstract shelving that is also mirror and screen. Nine of the products make their industry debut, including a new floor lamp for the Typography collection produced by Rakumba, a re-edition of pendant light Levity as a single line instead of a loop, and a prototype of a sofa upholstered in Kvadrat fabric. Products also include Francesca Simen’s Suavis bamboo silk carpet for B & B Italia, the Orbis floor lamp by Herbert H. Schultes for Classicon, Dunes bone china tableware by Philippe Malouin for 1882 Ltd., and the Nelson Bubble pendant by George Nelson for Herman Miller.

“It’s the perfect metaphor for blurred boundaries.”

Twenty-one panels of Kvadrat textile with a giant blow-up of a camouflage pattern distinguishes the facade of the home. “It’s the perfect metaphor for blurred boundaries,” Joel laughs.

Noticeably lacking in the Truly Truly house: technology. “That’s quite a personal choice for Kate and I,” Joel explains. “Our home is where we go to relax and slow down.”

Das Haus by Truly Truly: Maximizing the Home with Blurred Boundaries
 

Das Haus 2019 by Truly Truly. Photo courtesy of Koelnmesse.

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