TORONTO’S LIFEGUARD STATIONS TRANSFORMED INTO LIVELY WINTER STATIONS

Winter Stations
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A successful first edition of the international competition to re-animate to Toronto's frozen beaches

It’s no secret that Canadian winters are glacial, but life continues under layers of wool and fleece. However, Toronto’s city beaches become a desolate wasteland in winter’s icy grasp winter. In an attempt to breathe life into the beach-turned-frozen-tundra, Toronto’s international Winter Stations design competition was born.

A joint creation of RAW Design, Ferris + Associates and Curio, this year marks the competition’s first edition. The competition drew proposals from 36 countries for a total of 196 submissions. Of the numerous entries, five finalists were declared and five lifeguard stations were transformed into interactive installations to draw the city’s population to the shore. The designs were constructed mid-February and will remain on display until March 20th, 2015.

TORONTO’S LIFEGUARD STATIONS TRANSFORMED INTO LIVELY WINTER STATIONS
 

Made from reused timber, Driftwood Throne by Daniel Madeiros is a sheltered escape from the winter weather.

 

Hotbox by Michaela MacLeod & Nicholas Croft functions like a traditional ice house. An oculus lets light flood the soft, warm interior in direct contrast with the harsh exterior conditions.

 

What’s more fun than a swing? Nothing, that’s what! Sling Swing by Ed Butler, Dan Wiltshire and Frances McGeown invites to come and play, depending entirely upon the body heat of visitors to provide warmth.

 

Snow Cone by Lily Jeon & Diana Koncan is a bright, happy shelter that functions like an igloo, blocking out the cold by being airtight.

 

Like a giant wingback chair, Wing Back by Timothy Olson is an enveloping seat that blocks the northern winds and is warmed by a central fire ring.