You could eat dinner in the mouth of this insane cobra-shaped skyscraper

Vasily Klyukin
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The sight of a giant cobra rearing up in the middle of a city skyline may seem like something out of a horror movie to Westerners, but in many Asian countries, snakes are symbols of wisdom and eternal life. Russian architect Vasily Klyukin designed a snake-shaped tower to reflect this positive interpretation and entice developers in the Middle East and Asia.

While serpents seem menacing in most Western cultures, Asian cultures see them as positive figures. In China, snakes and dragons often symbolize the same thing and are custodians of temples, treasure, esoteric knowledge and all lunar gods. Appropriating these meanings, the cobra-shaped tower design aims to become a symbol of resurrection for cities.

The round base of the tower rises like a serpent’s body and extends to form an open-mouthed head, which could house a terraced restaurant or nightclub. The body itself would house offices or apartments . The diamond-shaped pattern on the back of the snake is the symbol of Yang and Yin, duality and reunification of the Sun and the Moon, male and female principles, conciliation of opposites, and androgyny. Like the snake changes its skin, the skyscraper changes color at night.

Klyukin believes that skyscrapers are symbols of cultural progress around the world. He believes that this tower could act in the same way, while embracing the symbols that the serpent represents.

You could eat dinner in the mouth of this insane cobra-shaped skyscraper
 

Asian Cobra Tower by Vasily Klyukin

 

The round base of the tower rises like a serpent's body and extends to form an open-mouthed head, set to house a terraced restaurant or nightclub.